Carmelo Alongi

Carmelo Alongi is a student who has just started his training at University with the London Ambulance Service to become an EMT and eventually a Paramedic. Hopefully this blog will allow an interesting insight for everyone into the process of training tomorrow's Paramedics, and a chronicle of my life as I progress. I blog under this name as a tribute to my Italian Grandfather, Carmelo Alongi.

Friday, November 17, 2006

DICKHEAD.

I've been reading back what I've written over the past few days and in a way I'm disgusted. I've been rude, obnoxious and generally a wanker. I know I said earlier that this was the end of the subject but its still been playing on my mind quite a bit. Even my Missus said I was being "big-headed". I was. I know I've pissed a fair few people off about this, I would like to properly apologise.

It shouldn't have taken an episode like this for me to come to my senses, but unfortunately it did.

From now on, things will be different. Promise.

3 Comments:

  • At 12:43 a.m., Anonymous Anonymous said…

    Well done for realising it.

     
  • At 10:44 a.m., Blogger caramaena said…

    Things happen... You learn, you grow, you move on.

    Will we get to read about the observational shift soon :)

     
  • At 7:48 p.m., Blogger Donkey said…

    Mate, we all make mistakes. The key to it is to learn from them. One of my little maxims in life is that I can make as many mistakes as I like, as long as I don't make the same one twice (doesn't always work out, but I try!).

    You've been big enough, intelligent enough, and mature enough to realise you've dropped one, admitted it and apologised for it. Don't beat yourself up over it any more, just treat it as reflective practice (practise? I can never remember which is which...) and put it away. Don't carry it around on your shoulders. You've got enough to worry about with your studying!

    I must admit that I was tempted to reply differently to your original comment on Tom's blog, along the lines of "real life on the job ain't university/training school", but tempered my reply to a defence of Tom's situation. Keeping your head down for a while when you first start is, in my humble opinion, a good thing to do. Try not to p*** people off early on, because they'll close ranks and you'll hate the job. Go with the flow for a while (within reason, obviously). Once you get to know the people you are/will be working with and observe their various styles of working and skill level/lack of skill level, you're better placed to make your own decisions on the good and the bad bits and find your own way of working.

    Me? UK EMT, 2-and-a-bit years service (so still a newbie, really), made plenty of mistakes so far, still don't check whether the torch works, still love the job.

     

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